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Do you smell what I smell?

April 30, 2019 dna 0
A new study sheds light on understanding the extensive individual differences in how we sense odors. By showing that small changes in a single olfactory receptor gene can affect how strong and pleasant a person finds an odor, the findings expand understanding of how olfactory receptors in the nose encode information about the properties of odors even before that information reaches the brain.
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Deadly box jellyfish antidote discovered using CRISPR genome editing

April 30, 2019 dna 0
Researchers studying how pain works have discovered an antidote to the deadly sting delivered by the most venomous creature on Earth — the Australian box jellyfish. A single sting to a human causes necrosis of the skin, excruciating pain and, if the dose of venom is large enough, cardiac arrest and death within minutes. The new antidote, discovered using CRISPR genome editing techniques, blocks the symptoms within 15 minutes after contact.
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Environmental pollutants could impact cellular signs of aging

April 30, 2019 dna 0
Researchers have linked some environmental pollutants with diseases, a decreased life span and signs of premature aging, such as wrinkles and age spots. But can accelerated aging be detected at the cellular level in healthy people exposed to pollutants? Now, researchers report that although pollutant exposure can affect two hallmarks of aging in people (mitochondrial DNA content and telomere length), the results are not so clear-cut.
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Adverse events during first years of life may have greatest effect on future mental health

April 30, 2019 dna 0
A new study has found evidence that children under 3 years old are most the vulnerable to the effects of adversity — experiences including poverty, family and financial instability, and abuse — on their epigenetic profiles, chemical tags that alter gene expression and may have consequences for future mental health.
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Direct-to-Consumer Genetic Testing’s Red Herring: “Genetic Ancestry” and Personalized Medicine.

April 30, 2019 dna 0
Related Articles

Direct-to-Consumer Genetic Testing’s Red Herring: “Genetic Ancestry” and Personalized Medicine.

Front Med (Lausanne). 2019;6:48

Authors: Blell M, Hunter MA

Abstract
The growth in the direct-to-consumer genetic testing industry poses a number of challenges for healthcare practice, among a number of other areas of concern. Several companies providing this service send their customers reports including information variously referred to as genetic ethnicity, genetic heritage, biogeographic ancestry, and genetic ancestry. In this article, we argue that such information should not be used in healthcare consultations or to assess health risks. Far from representing a move toward personalized medicine, use of this information poses risks both to patients as individuals and to racialized ethnic groups because of the way it misrepresents human genetic diversity.

PMID: 30984759 [PubMed]