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Learning from nature’s bounty: New libraries for drug discovery

June 30, 2019 dna 0
Natural products make some of our most potent medicines, among which macrocycles with their large carbon-rich ring systems are one class. Their size and complexity has made it difficult to emulate on Nature’s success in the laboratory. By completing a complex molecular synthesis of these compounds attached to a unique identifying DNA strand, Chemists have built a rich collection of natural product-like macrocycles that can be mined for new medicines.
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Viruses found to use intricate ‘treadmill’ to move cargo across bacterial cells

June 30, 2019 dna 0
Using advanced technologies to explore the inner workings of bacteria, biologists have provided the first example of cargo within bacteriophage cells transiting along treadmill-like structures. The discovery demonstrates that bacteria have more in common with sophisticated human cells than previously believed.
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Tracking life’s first step: Two molecules ‘awaken’ brand new genome

June 30, 2019 dna 0
Within hours after fertilization, a unique genome forms from chromosomes contributed by the egg and sperm. However, this new genome is initially inactive and must be ‘awakened’ to begin the transcription of its DNA and start embryonic development. How life’s first step happens has long fascinated developmental biologists.
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Researchers find cause of rare, fatal disease that turns babies’ lips and skin blue

June 30, 2019 dna 0
Scientists used a gene editing method called CRISPR/Cas9 to generate mice that faithfully mimic a fatal respiratory disorder in newborn infants that turns their lips and skin blue. The new laboratory model allowed researchers to pinpoint the ailment’s cause and develop a potential and desperately needed nanoparticle-based treatment. Mostly untreatable, Alveolar Capillary Dysplasia with Misalignment of Pulmonary Veins (ACDMPV) usually strikes infants within a month of birth.
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What made humans ‘the fat primate’?

June 30, 2019 dna 0
How did humans get to be so much fatter than our closest primate relatives, despite sharing 99% of the same DNA? A new study suggests that part of the answer may have to do with an ancient molecular shift in how DNA is packaged inside fat cells, which curbed our body’s ability to turn ‘bad’ white fat into ‘good’ brown fat.