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Industry perspectives on prenatal genetic testing.

July 14, 2019 dna 0
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Industry perspectives on prenatal genetic testing.

Semin Perinatol. 2018 08;42(5):314-317

Authors: Swanson A, Goldberg JD

Abstract
Until recent years, prenatal genetic tests have been almost exclusively developed and implemented by academic physicians and laboratories. In the last several years, industry has led the development of novel prenatal genetic tests, funded clinical trials and implemented these tests into clinical practice. That these efforts have been driven by industry has raised questions about diagnostics development regulations, consistency in reporting of results, and management of potential conflicts of interest. In this article, these topics are addressed from an industry perspective. While commercial laboratories may have the resources to develop and offer novel genetic tests, collaboration with healthcare providers is crucial for appropriate, effective, and efficient utilization of such tests.

PMID: 30241950 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

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Using genetic genealogy databases in missing persons cases and to develop suspect leads in violent crimes.

June 16, 2019 dna 0
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Using genetic genealogy databases in missing persons cases and to develop suspect leads in violent crimes.

Forensic Sci Int. 2019 May 14;301:107-117

Authors: Kennett D

Abstract
In the last year direct-to-consumer (DTC) genetic genealogy databases have been used to identify suspects and missing persons in over fifty cold cases, many of which have been unsolved for decades. Genealogists worked on these cases in collaboration with law enforcement agencies. Raw DNA data files were uploaded to the genealogy websites GEDmatch and FamilyTreeDNA, and identification was made by tracing the family trees of relatives who were predicted to be close genetic matches in the database. Such searches have far-reaching consequences because they affect not just those who have consented to upload their DNA results to these databases but also all of their relatives, regardless of whether or not they have taken a DNA test. This article provides an overview of the methods used, the potential privacy and security issues, and the wider implications for society. There is an urgent need for forensic scientists, bioethicists, law enforcement agencies, genetic genealogists and other interested parties to work together to produce international guidelines and policies to ensure that the techniques are used responsibly and effectively.

PMID: 31153988 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

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Direct-to-Consumer Genetic Testing’s Red Herring: “Genetic Ancestry” and Personalized Medicine.

May 31, 2019 dna 0
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Direct-to-Consumer Genetic Testing’s Red Herring: “Genetic Ancestry” and Personalized Medicine.

Front Med (Lausanne). 2019;6:48

Authors: Blell M, Hunter MA

Abstract
The growth in the direct-to-consumer genetic testing industry poses a number of challenges for healthcare practice, among a number of other areas of concern. Several companies providing this service send their customers reports including information variously referred to as genetic ethnicity, genetic heritage, biogeographic ancestry, and genetic ancestry. In this article, we argue that such information should not be used in healthcare consultations or to assess health risks. Far from representing a move toward personalized medicine, use of this information poses risks both to patients as individuals and to racialized ethnic groups because of the way it misrepresents human genetic diversity.

PMID: 30984759 [PubMed]

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Direct-to-Consumer Genetic Testing’s Red Herring: “Genetic Ancestry” and Personalized Medicine.

May 31, 2019 dna 0
Related Articles

Direct-to-Consumer Genetic Testing’s Red Herring: “Genetic Ancestry” and Personalized Medicine.

Front Med (Lausanne). 2019;6:48

Authors: Blell M, Hunter MA

Abstract
The growth in the direct-to-consumer genetic testing industry poses a number of challenges for healthcare practice, among a number of other areas of concern. Several companies providing this service send their customers reports including information variously referred to as genetic ethnicity, genetic heritage, biogeographic ancestry, and genetic ancestry. In this article, we argue that such information should not be used in healthcare consultations or to assess health risks. Far from representing a move toward personalized medicine, use of this information poses risks both to patients as individuals and to racialized ethnic groups because of the way it misrepresents human genetic diversity.

PMID: 30984759 [PubMed]

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Direct-to-Consumer Genetic Testing’s Red Herring: “Genetic Ancestry” and Personalized Medicine.

May 31, 2019 dna 0
Related Articles

Direct-to-Consumer Genetic Testing’s Red Herring: “Genetic Ancestry” and Personalized Medicine.

Front Med (Lausanne). 2019;6:48

Authors: Blell M, Hunter MA

Abstract
The growth in the direct-to-consumer genetic testing industry poses a number of challenges for healthcare practice, among a number of other areas of concern. Several companies providing this service send their customers reports including information variously referred to as genetic ethnicity, genetic heritage, biogeographic ancestry, and genetic ancestry. In this article, we argue that such information should not be used in healthcare consultations or to assess health risks. Far from representing a move toward personalized medicine, use of this information poses risks both to patients as individuals and to racialized ethnic groups because of the way it misrepresents human genetic diversity.

PMID: 30984759 [PubMed]

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Direct-to-Consumer Genetic Testing’s Red Herring: “Genetic Ancestry” and Personalized Medicine.

May 29, 2019 dna 0
Related Articles

Direct-to-Consumer Genetic Testing’s Red Herring: “Genetic Ancestry” and Personalized Medicine.

Front Med (Lausanne). 2019;6:48

Authors: Blell M, Hunter MA

Abstract
The growth in the direct-to-consumer genetic testing industry poses a number of challenges for healthcare practice, among a number of other areas of concern. Several companies providing this service send their customers reports including information variously referred to as genetic ethnicity, genetic heritage, biogeographic ancestry, and genetic ancestry. In this article, we argue that such information should not be used in healthcare consultations or to assess health risks. Far from representing a move toward personalized medicine, use of this information poses risks both to patients as individuals and to racialized ethnic groups because of the way it misrepresents human genetic diversity.

PMID: 30984759 [PubMed]

No Image

Direct-to-Consumer Genetic Testing’s Red Herring: “Genetic Ancestry” and Personalized Medicine.

May 28, 2019 dna 0
Related Articles

Direct-to-Consumer Genetic Testing’s Red Herring: “Genetic Ancestry” and Personalized Medicine.

Front Med (Lausanne). 2019;6:48

Authors: Blell M, Hunter MA

Abstract
The growth in the direct-to-consumer genetic testing industry poses a number of challenges for healthcare practice, among a number of other areas of concern. Several companies providing this service send their customers reports including information variously referred to as genetic ethnicity, genetic heritage, biogeographic ancestry, and genetic ancestry. In this article, we argue that such information should not be used in healthcare consultations or to assess health risks. Far from representing a move toward personalized medicine, use of this information poses risks both to patients as individuals and to racialized ethnic groups because of the way it misrepresents human genetic diversity.

PMID: 30984759 [PubMed]