Non-coding genetic variant could improve key vascular functions

Researchers have found a previously unknown genetic factor — a common non-coding sequence of DNA — that can either raise or reduce the risk of coronary artery disease or ischemic stroke.
View More Non-coding genetic variant could improve key vascular functions

New ‘SLICE’ tool can massively expand immune system’s cancer-fighting repertoire

Researchers have devised a CRISPR-based system called SLICE, which will allow scientists to rapidly assess the function of each and every gene in ‘primary’ immune cells — those drawn directly from patients. The new method, described in the Nov. 15 issue of Cell, provides researchers with a powerful tool that will guide their decision-making when determining how best to engineer immune cells to fight cancer and a host of other diseases.
View More New ‘SLICE’ tool can massively expand immune system’s cancer-fighting repertoire

Brain, muscle cells found lurking in kidney organoids grown in lab

New research has identified rogue cells — namely brain and muscle cells — lurking within kidney organoids. Such cells make up only 10 to 20 percent of an organoid’s cells, but their presence indicates that the ‘recipes’ used to coax stem cells into becoming kidney cells inadvertently are churning out other cell types.
View More Brain, muscle cells found lurking in kidney organoids grown in lab

The Trojan horse of Staphylococcus aureus

A weapons of Staphylococcus aureus is ?-toxin, which destroys host cells by forming pores in their membranes. Researchers at UNIGE have identified the mechanism that allows these pores to be harmful. They uncover how proteins of human cells assemble into a complex to which pores are docked. They also demonstrate that blocking the assembly of the complex by removing one of its elements allows pores to be removed from the membrane and cells to survive.
View More The Trojan horse of Staphylococcus aureus

Parental ‘feeding styles’ reflect children’s genes

New research challenges the idea that a child’s weight largely reflects the way their parents feed them. Instead, parents appear to adopt feeding styles in response to their children’s natural body weight, which is largely genetically influenced.
View More Parental ‘feeding styles’ reflect children’s genes